However, the negotiations under the auspices of the NBI have not carried out one of the most fundamental tasks of the Organization: the creation of a sustainable legal framework and an institution that is “acceptable” to all States throughout the basin. The diplomatic undertaking that led to the adoption of the agreement on the Cooperation Framework for the Niais Basin (CFA) faced many challenges. I assert that, despite unprecedented summits in cooperative dialogues, widely presented from the upstream point of view as a “political triumph”, the legal and hydropolitical discourse that led to the final framework of the CFA did not appease the “expectations” of two important states of detention on stilts: Egypt and Sudan. This was an existential threat to the institutional future of the NBI itself and to the noble goals it sought to achieve. Nevertheless, the organizational situation in the basin has also shown that the Nilanrain countries have little choice but to revive the “declining” momentum and ensure that the NBI undertaking is concluded in an “inclusive” and “fair” manner. Otherwise, according to the author, the alternative would not only represent a bleak future from the point of view of cooperation and optimal development of the Nile`s resources, but would also stifle the permanent river interests of the basin states. . . .